Russian National Orchestra

Press Acclaim


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Shostakovich Symphony No. 7
I. Allegretto
II. Moderato (poco allegretto)
III. Adagio
IV. Allegro non troppo
Paavo Järvi, conductor
2016 Grammy Nomination, Best Surround Sound Album
Diapason d'Or de l'année 2015
MusicWeb Recording of the Year (2015)
Diapason d'Or (September 2015)
MusicWeb Recording of the Month (April 2015)
5176511 (2015)

Acclaim for Shostakovich Symphony No. 7

Orchestral Splendour
"Järvi takes exactly what many listeners now consider to be the right approach... lean, sinewy and free of bombast -- but never at the expense of the sheer overwhelming force of the music, which is always given full measure in this remarkable reading. Swifter than most (it is accommodated on a single disc), this performance is accorded one of PentaTone's most wide-ranging recordings, and the sheer impact of the climaxes is nigh overwhelming."

CD Choice (May 2015) [more]

"You simply won't hear a more thoughtful and revealing performance of the Leningrad than this... Even more impressive is the superb recording, whose perspectives are as close to the concert-hall experience as I've heard in a very long time... An unaffected, deeply humanising Seventh; quite possibly the best thing Paavo Järvi has ever done."

Music Web International [more]

"Do we need another Shostakovich symphony? Yes we do, and especially this one!... [Paavo Järvi] shows himself to be a true conveyor of the deeper meaning of this symphony without succumbing to personal glory. And the RNO is the perfect vehicle... We owe, once again, much to the Pentatone engineers for transmitting the wide dynamics without the slightest distortion and with a detailed soundstage embracing you to the point of complete involvement. It's my fourth version of this symphony and I would not want to be without it. Highly recommended!"

HRAaudio.net [more]

Symphonic Recording of the Year
"All bets were off in Moscow when Paavo Jarvi decided to record the "Leningrad" Symphony, but he produced one of his best recordings yet with a reading that is refreshingly radical, while avoiding the ponderousness that often plagues this work."

Diapason