Russian National Orchestra

Press Acclaim

Acclaim for Kent Nagano

"[Tchaikovsky Violin and Piano Concertos is] ... conducted by none other than Kent Nagano [with] the fabulous Russian National Orchestra... The orchestral playing is typically East European with pungent winds and earthy passionate string playing, but very heavily tempered and disciplined by a more Western sensibility. Best of both worlds?!... The sound is clear and agile, yet marvellously weighty. [This] recording clearly sounds more sincere and wonderfully performed with technical assurance, compared to the sterile sounding current recordings from more prestigious labels. Highly recommended. "

Audio Asylum (November 2003)

"The Russian National Orchestra never lets us forget that Peter and the Wolf is a Russian work. Everything is lavishly colorful and fast-paced... Nonetheless, Kent Nagano elicits subtle touches: Peter's theme is lithe and elegant [and] the horns play with surprising subtlety and roundness... this is a first-class Peter in a crowded field."

American Record Guide (November 2003)

"Kent Nagano has come up with another coup in this remarkable for-charity super-audio CD. [Wolf Tracks] is pleasant and tuneful and delightfully crafted... The Russian National Orchestra plays with great distinction, in a typically Nagano-style, fastidiously balanced recording."

Manchester Music (October 2003)

"The Russian National Orchestra and Kent Nagano play like angels."

The Times (London) (September 2003)

"Kent Nagano’s concert with the Russian National Orchestra is not just a musical event, it is a landmark… Any performance of a conductor from the highest league with a Russian orchestra makes history, but in this case we have seen not just a single performance but evidence of a regular collaboration."

Vremya MN (February 2003)

"Nagano was playing with timbres skillfully, placing unexpected accents which were articulated by the orchestra with great precision … It was brilliant playing, in which Nagano and the RNO fulfilled every expectation."

Gazeta (February 2003)

"From the first notes of Liszt’s symphonic poem “Les Preludes” it became clear that the conductor would leave not a single bar, not a single note to flow routinely on its own. The orchestra followed his every gesture with utmost attention as it was striving to perceive and convey the feeling of wonder and fresh emotion which Nagano elicited at every turn of his musical thought."

Vedomosti (February 2003)